Spousal Support

Spousal Support

couple-arguingFlorida Divorce Lawyers are responsible for negotiating financial settlements, such as alimony, on behalf and in the best interests of their client. However, we are also beholden to Florida statutes regarding alimony and must adhere to the laws governing spousal support. It is an unfortunate fact that these troubling economic times can make spousal support even more contentious, but the truth is the laws governing spousal support prohibit alimony payments that do not correspond to a demonstrated need. I work closely with all of my clients to better understand the needs of the spouse who is requesting alimony, as well as, the financial capabilities of the spouse being asked to make support payments. As a Florida lawyer practicing in this area I know that the courts will determine spousal support based upon the following criteria:

  1. Need
  2. Standard of living during the marriage
  3. The length and duration of the marriage
  4. The financial resources and assets of both parties
  5. Age and physical condition of both parties
  6. Contribution to the marriage in terms of support (worked while one went to school, childcare, career contribution, etc)
  7. Time necessary to get a job, go back to school, etc.

While the courtroom scenario makes for good television, I feel that it can escalate an already tense situation. Whenever possible, I urge the use of mediation and other methods of ADR to resolve issues of child custody. As a Florida lawyer and a parent myself I know that children are best served by healthy, harmonious environments. While it may not be possible for the mother and father to live harmoniously under the same roof it is always possible for them to put aside enmity in order to provide a stable and united front when it comes to custodial resolutions.

I understand that it is very difficult, at times, for men to achieve a fair and reasonable divorce and custody settlement, and for this reason I have decided to specialize (but not be exclusive to) men’s rights in family court.