Robbery
If you have been arrested and charged with a robbery offense in Florida, it is important that you consult with an experienced Florida Robbery Attorney as soon as possible.
Robbery and
Aggravated
Robbery in Florida

Robbery is considered a property crime under Florida law. In order to be convicted of a robbery offense, the State must be able to prove that you took property or money from someone else without their consent, that the taking was done by use of force, threats, or intimidation. In addition, the property involved must have some value, no matter whether that value is really low or extremely high. Finally, the State must be able to prove that you intentionally took the property or money of the victim, even if you only intended to do so temporarily.

Robbery generally is considered a felony offense, the severity of which depends on the facts and circumstances of your case. However, Florida law typically classifies robbery offenses into three categories: robberies where the offender carried a firearm or other deadly weapon, robberies where the offender carried a weapon, and robberies where the offender did not carry a weapon.

Aggravated robbery is similar to general robbery, but it occurs when the offender uses a weapon on the victim or inflicts serious bodily harm that results in disability or disfigurement.

Other Robbery Charges in Florida

There are a number of other robbery charges you can face depending on the facts and circumstances of your case. For example, you can be charged with carjacking if you take the motor vehicle of another through the use of force, threats, or intimidation. This offense is a first-degree felony, where you can face up to thirty years in jail. However, if you carried a gun or other deadly weapon during the carjacking, you can possibly face up to life in prison.

Other robbery charges in Florida include robbery by a sudden snatching, like purse snatching for example, and home invasion robbery. Robbery by sudden snatching is considered a third-degree felony where penalties can include up to five years in jail, and a fine of up to $5,000. Like any robbery charge, if you were carrying a weapon at the time of the robbery, the offense is more serious and is considered a second-degree felony. Penalties for a second-degree felony conviction can include up to fifteen years in jail and a fine of up to $10,000. Home invasion robbery is an even more serious offense that occurs when one enters the home of another with the intent to rob the home. The degree of the offense again depends on whether or not you were carrying a weapon or a firearm, but in the most extreme cases, you can potentially face up to life in jail.

Penalties for
Robbery in
Florida

While penalties for a robbery offense generally depend on the facts and circumstances of your case, a robbery that is committed without a weapon is a second-degree felony. The penalties associated with a second-degree felony conviction can include up to fifteen years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000. However, if a deadly weapon is used in the commission of the offense, as is the case in an aggravated robbery, the offense is considered a first-degree felony where penalties can include up to life in prison depending on the facts of your case.

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